How long do I need to wait after my first IVF pregnancy to undergo another cycle?

Share this:
Q:

How soon post-pregnancy can I undergo another embryo transfer?

A:

It is not unusual for a patient at her last obstetrics ultrasound visit to ask me when she can come back for another baby.

My answer is to make this pregnancy and this baby your priority for at least one year. Once you are done breastfeeding (if that is part of the plan) and have completely weaned for at least one month, come back to see me. At this visit, we can set up your pre-embryo transfer testing (saline infusion ultrasound, practice transfer and consents), sign consents and update any bloodwork.

I highly recommend waiting at least 12 months before another embryo transfer. I also recommend that women are completely done breastfeeding for 2-3 months and have had at least 2 menstrual cycles before we proceed with the next pregnancy.

This time is crucial, it allows your body time to heal from the first pregnancy, allows your hormones time to return to normal and it also gives you time to bond with your first baby before the next one comes along.

There is also strong evidence to encourage a pre-pregnancy interval of at least 12 months to optimize the health of the mother and baby.

I love this part of my job. I feel so lucky to be involved in building happy, healthy families.

Have a question? Ask us here.

View all questions from Dr. Candice O' Hern Perfetto.

Share this:
Profile Picture of Dr. Candice O' Hern Perfetto

Dr. Candice O'Hern Perfetto completed her fellowship training in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at Stanford University School of Medicine in 2014. While at Stanford University, she participated in resident education as a Clinical Instructor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, as well as earned recognition as the "Ernest and Amelia Gallo Post-Doctoral Fellow" for her research in recurrent pregnancy loss and embryo implantation. In 2011, Dr. Perfetto was the Chief Resident of Obstetrics and Gynecology at The George Washington University Medical Center in Washington, DC. She received her medical degree from Georgetown University School of Medicine in 2007.

 Full Bio